christine stuart / ctnewsjunkie

HARTFORD, CT — Stop & Shop Supermarket is adjusting their hours and suspending pickup services, the University of Connecticut Health system announced that it treated the 21st state resident to be diagnosed with COVID-19, and prayer services moved online.

Early Sunday morning the University of Connecticut Health system tweeted that it had treated and released the patient who tested positive.

“Fortunately, the patient is doing well, and all notifications have been provided to the local and state public health authorities,” the health system said.

Gov. Ned Lamont told “Face the Facts” host Mike Hydeck on NBC 30 that he expects a surge of COVID-19 patients at intensive care units. He said they already have “drive-through” testing sites set up with a physician’s permission and they will begin to erect mobile tent units outside some hospitals.

Those sites are currently outside Bristol, Greenwich and Waterbury Hospitals.

“We’re going to be expanding that,” Lamont said.

Meanwhile, Stop & Shop Supermarket emailed its customers to let them know that starting Monday it will reduce its hours of operation to 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at most locations.

All locations will remain open, but like most retailers, it is experiencing shortages.

“We are doing everything possible to get products to our stores and to restock the shelves in every community,” the company said in an email.

“As a result of unprecedented demand as well as product shortages in some areas, we have temporarily suspended our online pickup service until further notice,” the company added. “Our store associates will instead focus on stocking product and other key priorities that will better meet the needs of all customers at this time. The service will be made available again once product availability increases.”

The company apologize for the home delivery delays and the delays experienced on its website for online shoppers.

Many church services were also canceled Sunday to adhere to Lamont’s earlier executive order banning gatherings of more than 250 people.

Some churches have sought to move their services online during this time of uncertainty for their parishioners.

Synagogue and mosque services were also canceled on Friday and Saturday.

Mosques in South Windsor, Windsor, Berlin, Farmington Valley, and New Britain announced that they will not be holding Friday prayers until further notice. Friday congregational prayers are an obligatory religious activity for Muslims.

“The science is clear –  this outbreak is beginning to increase rapidly. As a community we have to take a responsible stand of caring for all of us and especially the most at risk, the elderly and those with diabetes, heart and lung disease,” said Dr. Reza Mansoor, president of the Islamic Association of Greater Hartford in Berlin and a cardiologist at Hartford Hospital.

The Farmington Valley American Muslim Center is another mosque that will be temporarily closing, and will instead have its imam livestream a Friday sermon and prayer. 

“We are taking proactive measure to keep our communities and cities safe and healthy,” said mosque President Khamis Abu-Hasaballah. “Hopefully through the live stream, community members can feel engaged even if it’s virtual.”